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Senior Mentoring Programs

 

Seniors mentoring youth may be the perfect match. Senior mentoring programs tap the valuable resource of knowledgeable older adults with time and energy to contribute, and direct all they have to offer toward children and youth in need of adult attention and support.

A senior mentoring arrangement can be much like an adoptive grandparent/grandchild relationship. Youth, teens, and children are matched up to older adults who they meet and communicate with on a regular basis. Interaction may occur in person, by telephone, or through the internet. Seniors can provide the extra care and interest so desperately needed by many young people today.

What Seniors Can Do for Young People in Mentoring Programs

Older adults have a lot to contribute. They can help children and youth to make their way through life, including:

  • Helping children with their homework
  • Showing interest and paying attention to the details of a young person’s life
  • Supporting youth and teens facing pivotal life decisions
  • Offering guidance and assistance with college applications
  • Assisting with job search and employment efforts
  • Providing support in situations that can be hard for young people to face alone

How Children and Youth Benefit from Senior Mentoring

Many schools and communities are realizing that senior mentoring can bring huge benefits to both the young people and seniors in the program, and to the community as a whole. Children and youth may open up more easily to senior mentors who are not involved with the family or school hierarchy. Being one step removed, a mentor has the advantage of greater objectivity in listening to and advising a young person. A mentor may sense challenges and difficulties a child is facing before the family members or faculty.

Senior Mentoring for At-Risk Youth

Senior mentoring is particularly valuable to youth living in at-risk situations. Sadly, too many young people today do not have a responsible, stable adult available to listen to their problems, help them with their schoolwork, and provide the supportive attention they need.

Many states have programs in which “foster-Grandparents” help at-risk youth. Senior mentors may help teen parents or young people with drug problems, or offer aid in preventing teen pregnancy. Most commonly, seniors help the youth they mentor academically. They help teens prepare assignments and study for tests, and support and encourage them through the college application process. Some colleges are turning to senior mentors to help their graduates through the process of finding employment.

Senior Mentoring Helps Break Down Age Barriers

American society has become segregated by age in the past several decades. Adults work with other adults, children attend school with other children, and older people live in housing with other senior citizens or live independently, often alone.

Senior mentoring helps break down the social age barriers. Intergenerational mentoring programs provide opportunities for older people and young people to mingle and learn from each other, to their mutual benefit.

Medical Alarm Systems for Senior Mentors

Intelligent, caring, older people have a great deal to offer to young people and the community. Seniors who devote their time and attention to mentoring youth will want to be prepared in case of a medical emergency, whether it happens at home or while volunteering in the community.

Modern mobile medical alarm systems can help you be prepared, no matter where you are should a health emergency arise. With a push of a button on a bracelet or pendant, you help is on the way, with no delay.

GPS tracking with new cellular-based systems allows the operator to pinpoint your location when a health crisis or emergency occurs. Our medical alert reviews can help you compare information about medical alarm systems currently available and the companies that provide them.

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